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How to align a sky dish

Updated April 17, 2017

A properly aligned Sky TV satellite dish is essential for high-quality television reception. Incorrect dish alignment can result in weak television signals and missing TV and radio channels. Find the correct orientation for your satellite dish with an online "satellite locator" tool and then use a directional compass and a digital-satellite signal strength meter to lock on to the strongest Sky TV signal.

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Access the Internet. Use a zip-code-based "satellite locator" website to find the correct bearing and reception (azimuth) angle for the Sky TV satellite, which is located at 28.2 degrees east in the sky. Write this information on a slip of paper. (See Resources.)

Reach your Sky TV satellite dish safely by using a raised platform, ladder or steps.

Identify the bolts or screws that secure the satellite dish to the dish mount. Loosen each bolt or screw by a half turn, or by enough to allow movement of the satellite dish.

Place the directional compass on the dish arm and gently move the satellite dish, from right to left, until it points in the correct direction.

Move the dish up or down to the correct reception (azimuth) angle. Use the azimuth markings on the dish mount to guide you.

Connect the digital satellite meter to the Low Noise Block converter device at the end of the dish arm. Carefully follow the manufacturer's connection instructions.

Move the dish carefully and slowly until you receive the strongest reading on the satellite meter's signal strength display.

Tighten all bolts and screws. Disconnect the satellite meter.

Warning

Always disconnect all TVs and satellite receivers from the main AC power supply before working on your satellite dish. Get a friend or neighbour to hold and steady the ladder while you climb it.

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Things You'll Need

  • Wrench
  • Screwdriver
  • Compass
  • Satellite TV signal meter

About the Author

Adrian Grahams began writing professionally in 1989 after training as a newspaper reporter. His work has been published online and in various newspapers, including "The Cornish Times" and "The Sunday Independent." Grahams specializes in technology and communications. He holds a Bachelor of Science, postgraduate diplomas in journalism and website design and is studying for an MBA.

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