How to stop a wind cough

Written by suzanna hulmes
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How to stop a wind cough
Chicken soup is a source of antibiotics. (Jodi Jacobson/Photodisc/Getty Images)

A wind cough is generally caused by wind entering the body at the level of the head. Wind that is not quickly expelled from the body can then invade farther, reaching the chest area. This can cause flu and cold symptoms, including the cough. There are two types of cough that can arise from this: the wind-cold and the wind-heat cough. These coughs will generally last less than three weeks, and there are several treatments that can be used to ease a cough. You should seek medical help if your cough continues to worsen after two weeks.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Warm clothing
  • Soup
  • Tea

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Identify your symptoms as either a wind-cold or a wind-heat flu by noting all the symptoms that you are experiencing besides coughing. A wind-cold flu will cause a headache, runny nose, layer of white coating on the tongue, aching shoulders and neck as well as an inability to stand the cold. A wind-heat flu can be identified through symptoms such as a sore throat, fever, lack of sweat or excessive sweating, blocked nose, vomiting and constant thirst.

  2. 2

    Keep the body warm to combat a wind-cold cough. You can do this by wearing warm clothing with long sleeves and keep the neck and chest area covered. You can also warm the body by sticking to hot foods such as chicken soup and hot drinks such as tea. Green tea is full of antioxidants and will help build the body's immune system, which can aid in treating a cough and other flu-like symptoms. Incorporate food items that have a warming effect on the body by encouraging perspiration such as ginger, coriander, chillies and cabbage. Avoid dairy products, fried and fatty foods because these will encourage the body to produce more phlegm.

  3. 3

    Combat a wind-heat cough by sticking to foods that do not aid in heating the body. Soups that include vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower, mushrooms, celery, carrots, potatoes and turnips will aid in cooling the body to rid it of the heat toxins. Avoid strong-flavoured and spicy foods such as chillies, garlic and scallions because these will cause the body to increase perspiration. Drink peppermint or chamomile tea with honey to aid in dispersing heat from the body.

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