How to Use a Sigma 10-20mm Camera Lens

Written by edwin navarro
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How to Use a Sigma 10-20mm Camera Lens
A wide-angle shot can be taken with a wide-angle lens such as the Sigma 10-20 mm lens. (Athens wide-angle view image by Georgios Alexandris from Fotolia.com)

A Sigma 10-20 mm camera lens is an ultra-wide zoom lens that can be used in single-lens reflex (SLR) digital cameras including Sigma, Nikon, Canon, Sony and Pentax. It has a relatively wide aperture, f3.5,throughout the entire zoom length which is suitable for low light photography. According to its manufacturer, it is "perfect for shooting landscape photography, architecture, building interiors, photojournalism, wedding photography, group pictures and more."

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Digital SLR camera
  • Sigma 10-20 mm lens

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Attach the lens to the camera body. Align the dot marks on the lens and on the camera mount. Press the lens mount button and rotate the lens counter-clockwise until it snaps into place.

  2. 2

    Set your camera's shooting mode to "Auto" or "Program." These modes will automatically set the camera's aperture and shutter speed to properly expose the scene.

  3. 3

    Look through the viewfinder and compose your shot. Rotate the lens barrel counter-clockwise to a lower millimetre value for a wider angle view. Rotate the lens barrel clockwise to a higher millimetre value for a less wide angle view.

  4. 4

    Press the shutter button halfway, in most cameras, to initiate auto-focus. When your subject is in focus, fully press the shutter button to capture the photo.

  5. 5

    View the result on your camera's LCD monitor. Take as many pictures as you like. Experiment with the different zoom length of the lens until you achieve your desired creative results.

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