How to Edge With Granite Cobblestone

Written by mason howard
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Granite, a type of igneous rock, is revered for its naturally coarse and speckled grain. Granite cobblestones are rectangular, brick-shaped blocks that are often used in paving, where they provide an Old World, rustic charm. However, it is also possible to use granite cobblestone blocks as edging material in lawns and gardens. Granite submerged and set on edge in the ground creates highly durable edging, while also adding attractive accents to your home's exterior landscape.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Stakes and string or garden hoses
  • Half-moon edging tool
  • Garden trowel
  • Two-by-four
  • Crushed rock
  • Sand
  • Rubber mallet

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Outline the desired course of the edging with stakes and string. For curvilinear edging, use garden hoses.

  2. 2

    Score two parallel lines along the outline, using a half-moon edging tool. Space the parallel lines at a distance from one another that is equal to the thickness of the cobblestones.

  3. 3

    Remove the stake and strings or garden hose.

  4. 4

    Dig a trench between the scored lines, using a garden trowel. Dig the trench to a depth that is equal to the width of the cobblestones. Drag the spade along the bed of the trench to smooth it out as much as possible.

  5. 5

    Tamp the bed of the trench with a two-by-four to compact the soil as much as possible.

  6. 6

    Add a 1-inch layer of crushed rock to the bed of the trench. Sprinkle sand over the crushed rock until it fills the gaps between the rocks.

  7. 7

    Insert the stones on edge, one by one, into the trench until the edging is complete. Tap the top edges of the stones gently with a rubber mallet to settle them in the gravel bed.

Tips and warnings

  • If necessary, stones cut be split to fit using a hammer and a chisel.

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