How to Dry Daffodil Bulbs

Written by jenny harrington Google
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How to Dry Daffodil Bulbs
Daffodil is one of the first spring flowers. (Daffodil image by azzzh from Fotolia.com)

Daffodils are one of the earlier-blooming spring flowers. With bright yellow or white flowers, they sometimes begin growing before the last winter snow has melted from the garden. Daffodil bulbs are usually planted in fall so they have time to produce a healthy root system before their spring debut. If the bulbs are being moved or divided, this usually happens in early to midsummer, though. Storing the bulbs properly until the prime fall planting time requires the daffodil bulbs to remain dry so they do not begin rotting.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Newspaper or trays

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Spread newspaper or cardboard trays out in a cool, dry room away from direct sunlight. Avoid using plastic or metal trays, as these collect moisture and condensation.

  2. 2

    Brush any excess soil from the daffodil bulbs. Inspect each one for signs of damage or soft spots that indicate rot. Dispose of those that are damaged in this way as they won't dry properly and may spread disease to healthy bulbs.

  3. 3

    Spread out the daffodil bulbs on the newspaper or trays. Place them so they do not touch each other, as this may inhibit drying.

  4. 4

    Check the bulbs weekly during drying for any signs of rot. Dispose of any affected. Dry the bulbs for two to three weeks.

  5. 5

    Brush off the dried roots on the bottom of each bulb and snap apart any smaller bulbs that are attached to the large bulbs. These smaller bulbs can be planted along with the others.

Tips and warnings

  • Store daffodil bulbs in paper, nylon or other breathable sacks in a cool, dry area until you are ready to replant in fall.
  • Moisture is the enemy of stored bulbs. Store in a place that remains dry and check the bulbs regularly during storage to make sure they are not rotting.

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