How to Use a Grout Bag to Grout Ceramic Tile

Written by kevin mcdermott
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Grout is a kind of cement that sits between tiles to bridge the gaps. It's normally applied with a grout float (a rubber trowel), spread over the whole tile surface and then wiped down with a sponge so that only the grout in the spaces remains. If the tile face will be difficult to sponge off because it has a flat or matt finish or is textured, then another option is a grout bag. It looks like a pastry bag and delivers the grout cleanly to just the lines, without getting it all over the face of the tile.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Grout
  • Bucket
  • Wooden spoon
  • Grout bag
  • Short dowel rod slightly wider than the grout lines
  • Broom
  • Sponge

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Mix the grout in a bucket with water, adding the water and stirring the mixture with a wooden spoon until the grout reaches the consistency of thick mud. Let it sit for 10 minutes. Re-stir.

  2. 2

    Scoop the grout out of the bucket with the spoon and fill the grout bag.

  3. 3

    Set the tip of the grout bag into one of the grout lines, starting at one corner of the tiled area (at the top, if it's a wall). Squeeze the grout bag while pulling the tip backward along the line, putting in enough grout that it just mounds over the top a little. Follow the line all the way to the other end of the tiled area.

  4. 4

    Repeat the process for each of the other lines, in both directions. Let the grout set for 10 to 15 minutes.

  5. 5

    Drag the end of a dowel rod over each grout line to level the grout and get it consistent from line to line.

  6. 6

    Wait 1/2 hour, then use a broom to sweep away the excess loose grout from the lines. After another 1/2 hour, wipe down the area with a damp sponge to pick up any remaining residue.

Tips and warnings

  • Wear a dust mask when mixing the grout.

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