How to fix a fallen arch

Written by jennifer brister
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How to fix a fallen arch
Foot Problems (Foot image by DXfoto.com from Fotolia.com)

A fallen arch occurs when the sole of the foot becomes flat. If you have a fallen arch, the entire bottom of the foot touches the ground while you are standing. Fallen arches can lead to all kind of problems, such as back and leg pain, and pain in the feet and ankles.

There are, however, several ways to treat fallen arches and reduce any pain you may be experiencing.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Speak to your doctor and ask if arch inserts are right for you. Arch inserts or supports are placed into the shoe to stabilise and align the foot. These supports also improve posture, which can reduce lower back pain.

  2. 2

    Ask your doctor about treatment using medication. People with fallen arches frequently take an anti-inflammatory drug or steroids to provide short-term pain relief.

  3. 3

    Try prolotherapy to repair any damage done to the tendons and cartilage. This type of therapy creates an inflammation around weak tendons, resulting in a more permanent solution to pain and the repair of damages caused by a fallen arch.

    During prolotherapy, dextrose is injected into the injured ligament or tendon. This causes a swelling in the weak area, which also increases blood supply and the flow of nutrients. This process stimulates the tissue and causes it to repair itself.

  4. 4

    Do exercises that will help treat your fallen arch. Stand with your feet together in front of a mirror. Allow your feet to shift inward, pushing your arches flatter to the floor. Pull your feet outward until you can see your arches rise and you see that your ankles are straight. Remain in this position for at least 10 seconds to build muscle strength and gain stability. Repeat this exercise daily.

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