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How to Make a Windchime Out of Beer Caps

Wind chimes made with recycled beer bottle caps are popular at local flea markets and craft shows. Also known as “hillbilly” or “redneck” wind chimes, these craft items can be made for very little money, and might bring a profit if you sell them at flea markets or to friends, family members and neighbours. Use creativity, and you can make customised wind chimes to suit almost every taste.

Drill a small hole in the centre of each bottle cap.

Coat the caps with glue. Use an old paint brush to apply the glue.

Place a small amount of glitter in a Ziploc bag. Add the bottle caps, seal the bag and shake until caps are covered in glitter.

Allow the bottle caps to dry.

Cut various lengths of twine, at least 12 pieces.

Attach bottle caps by stringing them onto the twine through the drilled hole. Tie the end of the twine in a knot to hold each cap. You may tie more than one cap onto a piece of twine, but tie a knot under each cap to hold it in place. Arrange the caps so that at least two are next to each other when you hang them in order for them to make noise when the wind blows.

Glue the twine pieces to a large metal ring. Place a dab of glue on the ring where you want the twine to hang and tie a knot over the glue with the twine. Try to place the twine pieces less than an inch apart to ensure that the wind chime works, allowing the caps to strike together in the wind.

Allow the glue to dry. Your homemade wind chime is now ready to hang.

Tip

Add seashells, nails or any object that will “clang” together in the wind to create a personalised wind chime. You can also hang the bottle caps so that two caps are next to each other on one piece of twine. Find a variety of metal rings to use for this project at your local hardware store.

Things You'll Need

  • Metal beer bottle caps (at least 12)
  • Drill
  • Ziploc bag
  • Glue
  • Old paint brush
  • Glitter
  • Twine
  • Scissors
  • Large metal ring
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About the Author

Angela LaFollette holds a Bachelor of Arts in advertising with a minor in political science from Marshall University. LaFollette found her passion for writing during an internship as a reporter for "The West Virginia Standard" in 2007. She has more than six years of writing experience and specializes in topics in garden and pets.