How to become an ABA therapist

Written by mallory sosinski
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Email

ABA, or Applied Behavior Analysis, is a behavioural intervention used to treat Autism and help Autistic children learn how to interact properly. ABA therapists "conduct rehabilitative and educational therapy with autistic children"; this can be a difficult and challenging job so proper training and qualifications are essential. The two types of certifications that can be earned are Board Certified Behavior Analyst and Board Certified Assistant Behavior Analyst.

Skill level:
Moderately Challenging

Other People Are Reading

Instructions

  1. 1

    Earn a bachelor's degree in ABA, psychology or another related scientific field. While earning this degree you will learn the necessary techniques and behavioural modifications to use with autistic children to help modify their behaviour.

  2. 2

    Achieve an M.S.Ed. in Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism. As this is another step up the degree ladder, this degree will be even "more focused on research-based analysis of behaviour science and its application to specific mental ailments, such as autism". This degree will also allow you to sit for the Behavior Analyst Certification Board certification exams, which you can only sit for once you've earned a master's degree.

  3. 3

    Move up another step and earn a Post-Professional Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis. This requires coursework beyond a master's "similar to graduate degrees, but with thesis and research courses left out".

Tips and warnings

  • Check the BACB website (Ree Resources) to learn about certification options, for bachelor's and master's degrees, and be sure to check out the list of approved ABA programs so you can be sure you're attending a program recognised by the BACB. They have programs listed around the world, so wherever you are, you can earn BACB certification.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.