How to build a brick outdoor barbeque grill

Written by jason gillikin
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How to build a brick outdoor barbeque grill
Brick grills are durable fixtures to grace your next summer cookout. (cybrgrl: flickr.com)

Outdoor grills make a great centrepiece for outdoor celebrations. They are durable and look great, and they can really add an elegant flair to any backyard social activity. With a bit of skill and some patience, any craftsman can fashion a sturdy and handsome brick grill that will help cook up the fun for summers to come.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Bricks
  • Mortar
  • Trowel
  • Iron grates (2)
  • Iron plate (3x3)

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Find a suitable location, one that is level, close to the food, but far enough from wooden structures or overhanging trees so the risk of fire is reduced. Consider a site that is removed from children's play areas too.

  2. 2

    Build a 16 square-foot foundation by pouring concrete or laying bricks. Use enough concrete or subsurface structure to provide for long-term stability depending on the material upon which you are building.

  3. 3

    Erect three walls, about four feet tall, on three sides of the foundation. Top the walls with bricks facing outward, for decorative flair. At the two-foot and three-foot levels in each wall, lay two bricks at 90 degrees to the others, with the overhanging portion extending inside the well of the grill. These bricks will be the supports on which the iron grates will rest.

  4. 4

    Place one iron grill at the three-foot level, resting on the six bricks that point inward as erected in Step 3. This grill will be the cooking area. At the two-foot level, place the other grill with the iron plate on top. This will be the surface on which the cooking fire will burn.

Tips and warnings

  • Consider some safety features, including weights or steel cables to keep the two iron grates attached to the sides of the grill. Substituting a shallow iron bowl for the flat plate would reduce the risk of burning material escaping and causing a fire, particularly in a high-wind area.
  • If you live in a planned community, check with the local association for any regulations governing fixed grills.

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