How to Make Frozen Juice Concentrate

Written by ehow food & drink editor
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Frozen juice concentrate was developed after the invention of reliable refrigeration systems in order to preserve citrus fruit grown in Florida's orchards. Frozen orange juice concentrate provided a tasty juice for World War II troops. It quickly became a hit with the American public and then the idea spread around the world. Making frozen fruit concentrate is an easy process that can be done in your kitchen. Read on to learn how to make frozen juice concentrate.

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Pour fruit juice into a narrow-necked, food-grade plastic container such as a gallon jug. Leave room for expansion during freezing (the jug should not be more than three-fourths full). Cap and freeze.

  2. 2

    Remove the cap once the juice is completely frozen and suspend the jug upside down over another container such as a wide-mouth jar.

  3. 3

    Allow the frozen juice to thaw out drip by drip into the lower container until just ice is left in the jug. The tastier, more colorful part of the frozen substance will melt before the plain water crystals.

  4. 4

    Discard the remaining less colorful ice in the jug once the juice has separated during the thawing.

  5. 5

    Pour the separated juice back into the now empty plastic jug and repeat the freezing and dripping procedure two more times to produce a fine concentrate.

  6. 6

    Store the concentrate in a jar or in ice trays in the freezer.

Tips and warnings

  • Ice cubes made from frozen juice concentrate can be used for making fruit smoothies or just used as ice in any kind of fruit drink.
  • Don't try to rush the thawing process by heat as doing so would cause the water crystals from the frozen substance to melt too quickly and dilute the juice concentrate.

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