High stomach acid symptoms

Written by brenda barron Google
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High stomach acid symptoms
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Having a high level of stomach acid can make you very uncomfortable. You are likely to suffer not only from acid indigestion, but also from heartburn, both of which can stem from digestive problems like irritable bowel syndrome and gastro-oseophageal reflux disease. High stomach acid produces its own set of symptoms that you should be aware of in case you decide to seek treatment.

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Sour Taste

A common symptom of having high stomach acid is sourness in your mouth. Since the acid is likely backing up into your oesophagus, you might notice an acidic taste in your throat or mouth. It's unpleasant and can make you feel like you might throw up.

Heartburn

Heartburn is one of the more obvious symptoms of high acid. If you have heartburn, you'll notice pain or a burning sensation in the middle of your chest. It can feel like it's going straight through your body and into your back. You might also notice these sensations in your throat.

Nausea

Since having a high level of acid in your stomach can cause stomach upset, feelings of nausea are to be expected. While it will usually stop there, some people also experience vomiting or a decreased appetite as their stomach is in turmoil.

Gas and Digestive Upset

High stomach acid can also create gas, which can be very unpleasant. Both burping and flatulence can come as a result of this condition. Bloating, which can cause pain and cramping, is also to be expected.

Burning and Pain

The most common symptom of high stomach acid is the burning sensation that appears right at your stomach, in the centre of your abdomen. This can be rather painful, and may make it difficult to focus on other things. Bending over and lying down tend to exacerbate the problem.

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