Requirements to Teach College Level Courses

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Requirements to Teach College Level Courses
(University campus, royalty-free image by harrykeely)

Teaching at the college level is challenging because of the many requirements needed to obtain a post as well as to maintain it. It is also rewarding because you affect others' lives positively. Many aspire to teach at the college level, but only a few know the requirements for teaching.

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Types

Requirements to teach college-level courses depend on the type of college where you want to teach. Community colleges require a master's degree, and universities require a doctorate. Some colleges may require a combination of degrees and teaching experience. Experience includes serving as a teaching assistant or researching with a renowned scholar.

Potential

There is potential for those who have completed the requirements to rise up the academic career ladder. The industry is competitive, so completing just the basic requirements is not enough. Those who become well-known in a field for their research may have a better chance of finding employment at more prestigious colleges.

Expert Insight

Individuals who meet the requirements are not guaranteed a teaching position. Those who aspire to be college professors not only need the necessary degrees and teaching experience, they also need to be well-published. Those who submit their research and papers for publication increase their chances of getting a post, as do those who network in academic circles aggressively.

Misconceptions

Some people may think you need to have a doctorate to teach college-level courses. Though this is usually the case, in some areas of study, a master's or bachelor's degree is enough. Creative writing classes can be taught by individuals with a Masters in Fine Arts; photography and technical classes can be taught by those with a bachelor's degree.

Specialisation

Most colleges require individuals to specialise in their field. Specialised training includes working with a research mentor, doing postgraduate work and obtaining fellowships to do research. Individuals who have specialised training are more competitive not only because they have more research under their belt, but also because they are regarded as experts in their area.

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