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How to Clean European Beech Wood

Belonging in the beech family of Fagaceae, European beech is a large tree that can reach heights of up to 160 feet tall. The European beech's short and fine grain means it is an easy-to-work-with wood and a good choice for furniture. Over time, the European beech wood will become dirty, dingy and require a thorough cleaning. Like other types of wood, abrasive cleaners and cleaning tools can leave the beech wood surface scratched and damaged. Fortunately, with the proper cleaning, the European beech will last for years.

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Wipe the surface dust and debris off the European beech wood with a lint-free cloth. Use a dust mop on beechwood floors.

Fill a bucket with 1 gallon of cool water and add 1 cup of distilled white vinegar. Stir the vinegar and water together with a spoon.

Dampen a lint-free cloth in the homemade cleaning solution and wipe the European beech wood clean. Dry the wood with a clean, lint-free cloth. Use a terry cloth mop dampened in the mixture to clean beech wood floors.

Fill a clean spray bottle with 1 1/2 cups of white vinegar and 3 tsp of light olive oil. Mist the sealed beech wood with the mixture and rub the wood with a lint-free cloth. The mixture will polish and restore the wood's shine naturally. Buff dry with a clean, lint-free cloth. Only apply this to sealed wood.

Dampen a lint-free cloth in linseed oil, and wipe unsealed beech wood with the damp cloth. Wipe with the wood grain. Let the oil sit on the wood for several minutes before buffing the unsealed beech wood with a clean lint-free cloth dampened with more linseed oil. Allow the wood to dry for several hours.

Tip

Regularly clean European beech wood to keep it looking its best. Always test the cleaning solution on an inconspicuous area of the wood. Wait 24 hours and examine the area. If damage or discolouration occurs, discontinue use.

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Things You'll Need

  • Lint-free cloths
  • Dust mop
  • Bucket
  • White vinegar
  • Spoon
  • Terry cloth mop
  • Spray bottle
  • Light olive oil
  • Linseed oil

About the Author

Amanda Flanigan began writing professionally in 2007. Flanigan has written for various publications, including WV Living and American Craft Council, and has published several eBooks on craft and garden-related subjects. Flanigan completed two writing courses at Pierpont Community and Technical College.

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