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How to Make Noah's Ark in Popsicle Sticks

Updated April 17, 2017

In the story of Noah's Ark, God warns Noah that a large flood is going to wipe out the population. Noah builds an enormous ark to save a pair of every animal and his family so they will be able to form a new civilisation after the flood. You can learn about this bible story by making your own simple ark using inexpensive household materials. This is a fun children's art project for Sunday school or at home.

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  1. Glue Popsicle sticks on top of each other to form a stack three inches high. Repeat to make another stack.

  2. Glue each stack to a long side of the styrofoam tray to make the panels of the ark. If any part of the styrofoam tray is still visible along the outside edge, trim it.

  3. Measure the width of the tray and cut enough Popsicle sticks to make two three-inch stacks. Glue the sticks into stacks, and glue the stacks to the remaining sides of the tray. You should have an enclosed ark.

  4. Glue two or three Popsicle sticks inside the ark from short end to short end. These will act as bars to which you'll attach people and animal figures.

  5. Cut Popsicle sicks into smaller pieces to build animals figures and people. For example, to make a person, cut one long piece for the body and glue on smaller pieces for the arms and legs. Cut heads from construction paper and glue on to the stick. Decorate with markers, yarn, paint or glitter.

  6. Glue or use clothespins to clip the Popsicle stick figures on the bars inside the ark, so they are visible and secure.

  7. Tip

    Use picture cutouts of animals instead of crafting them from Popsicle sticks.

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Things You'll Need

  • Popsicle sticks
  • Glue gun
  • Styrofoam tray (i.e., meat tray)
  • Scissors
  • Construction paper
  • Markers
  • Yarn (optional)
  • Paint (optional)
  • Glitter (optional)
  • Clothespins (optional)

About the Author

Since 2008, Jen Kim has been a professional writer and blogger, working for national publications such as Psychology Today and Chicago Tribune affiliates. She holds a Master of Science in journalism from Northwestern University.

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