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Can I make employees remove wedding rings at work for safety reasons?

Updated February 21, 2017

Accidents happen. Whether you manage an office or a factory, there are a number of reasons you may be concerned about your employees' wearing their wedding rings on the job. Many people do not feel comfortable removing their wedding rings, but if your employees work around machinery that could catch on jewellery, then requiring them to wear gloves may not be enough to protect them from injury. As a responsible employer, you may require your employees to remove wedding rings if there is a risk of serious injury.

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  1. Establish clear rules in your company's employee handbook about removal of jewellery in situations where it may create a safety hazard.

  2. Enforce the rules for all employees who work with machinery. When you establish a no-ring policy for your employees, establish clear reasons for the rule, providing accident examples and statistics to back up the rule, along with possible punishment if employees are caught wearing their wedding rings on the job. You may also require office employees to remove their rings in situations like printer jams, when they may have to reach inside small machines.

  3. Explain to employees who have concerns about removing their wedding rings in the workplace that your rules are there to keep them safe. When employees understand the immediate physical risks that could result if they do not comply, they may be more willing to accept the rules.

  4. Follow the rules yourself if you work on the factory floor on a regular basis. If you are married, removing your own wedding rings while in the workplace will show your employees that you are not an exception to the rule.

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Things You'll Need

  • Employee handbook

About the Author

Jennifer Hudock is an author, editor and freelancer from Pennsylvania. She has upcoming work appearing in two Library of the Living Dead Press anthologies and has been published in numerous print and online journals, including eMuse, Real TV Addict and Strange Horizons. She has a Bachelor of Arts in English/creative writing from Bloomsburg University.

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