Stain Removal for Dry Emulsion Jeans

Written by steven white | 13/05/2017
Stain Removal for Dry Emulsion Jeans
Water-based paint can permanently stain any surface. (paint image by jeancliclac from Fotolia.com)

Dried emulsion is the result of water-based paints binding with the fibres of clothing. While paints of this sort can easily be removed from wet stains, once the paint has dried the task becomes much more difficult and is not guaranteed. When removing dry emulsion stains from jeans, be sure to use a slightly abrasive scrubbing tool such as a washcloth to add some friction to the treatment.

Paint Removal Product

There are a number of paint-removal products in the marketplace. The most recommended brand is "Oops." This brand is available at most paint and hardware stores. Be sure to carefully follow the directions on chemical paint-removal products. To avoid exposure to the chemicals, always wear gloves and work in a well-ventilated room when treating the jeans.

Spirits

For those looking for a natural removal solution, strong spirits such as whiskey or vodka are known for dissolving dry emulsion paint. In fact, spirits are known to work so well that many artists use them to fix mistakes in their paintings. According to Linda Cobb, author of the best-selling book "Talking Dirty with the Queen of Clean," fresh spirits should always be used, and cheaper brands work just as well as the more expensive ones.

Turpentine

Turpentine, or paint thinner, is a substance known for its ability to break down emulsion bonds and weaken paint without ruining it. Turpentine can also be used to remove paint stains from clothing and carpet. When using turpentine, be sure to work in an open area and wear gloves. The best means for applying turpentine is to dab some on the stain and allow it to sit for 30 seconds, then rub the stain with a cotton cloth. Repeat this process until the stain is removed.

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