Specifications for the Bosch Fuel Injector

Written by amanda gronot
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Robert Bosch GmbH is a leading global manufacturer of automobile parts. The company was founded in 1886 by Robert Bosch in Stuttgart, Germany. In 1967, Bosch introduced the first fuel injection system with a high-pressure electric fuel pump. Fuel injection is a process that mixes fuel with air in an engine, thus enhancing combustion. The fuel injector is the nozzle and valve configuration that meters and atomises the fuel.

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Flow Quantity

Bosch makes over 30 types of fuel injectors. Their flow ranges from 142.5 grams per minute to 493.1 grams per minute at three bar (the atmospheric pressure at sea level). Flow is a measure of the amount of fuel the injector releases into the engine.

Operating Pressure

Bosch fuel injectors operate at air pressures ranging from 1 to greater than 3.63 Kilogram per square inch (psi). This measurement refers to the pressure inside the pump that compresses the fuel before it is released by the fuel injector.


The resistance for Bosch fuel injectors ranges from .07 to 15.9 ohms. Fuel injectors run on electricity -- usually around 12 volts. Resistance within their electric circuits helps dissipate unwanted excess energy.

Features and Design Type

Three of the Bosch fuel injectors, including the 0280150036, are hose-type. Some have a long body, like the 0280150706, while others, such as the 0280155777, have a standard body. A few use dual spray, including the 0280155968. Bosch labels the design of its fuel injectors as either EV1 or EV6. The EV1 is the earlier design type: it is a pintle injector, meaning it has tapered needle that atomises and sprays the fuel into the engine. The EV6, on the other hand, is a disc-type or "director plate" style injector, which has four small holes to better atomise the fuel.

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