DISCOVER
×
Loading ...

How to Install an Isuzu Rodeo's Fuel Filter

Updated February 21, 2017

If your Isuzu Rodeo is having trouble starting, is stalling while driving, or doesn't accelerate well, you may have a failing fuel filter. The fuel filter resides near the fuel pump. It filters out tiny pollutants in the gasoline from the tank before it reaches the engine. If the filter clogs or is damaged --- perhaps by a pothole or rock --- gasoline may not smoothly reach the engine. Replacing a fuel filter on an Isuzu Rodeo is an uncomplicated process that shouldn't take more than 25 minutes.

Loading ...

Open the bonnet of your Isuzu Rodeo. Unscrew the cap on the Shrader valve near the fuel injectors with your fingers. Press down on the Shrader valve with a paper towel to release pressure from the fuel lines. This action prevents gasoline from splashing on you when you take out the filter.

Raise the Isuzu Rodeo with a jack near the rear driver's side wheel. Rest the Rodeo on the jack stand for additional safety.

Put on gloves. Place plastic cup below the fuel filter, which is a small cylindrical canister from which two pipes protrude. It's attached to the frame rail near the rear driver's side tire.

Hold the nut on the outlet side of the fuel filter with a 1/2-inch wrench. Grip the hex nut of the pipe with your other wrench. Turn the hex nut counterclockwise to loosen it. Pull the pipe out of the fuel filter. Direct it at once down toward the cup to catch any leaking gasoline. Repeat this process for the inlet pipe.

Loosen the bolt on the fuel filter strap. Take out the fuel filter and set it aside.

Insert the replacement fuel filter into the strap, oriented the same way as the old fuel filter; outlet end facing the outlet pipe and inlet end facing the inlet pipe. Thread the pipes into the joints of the fuel filter. Secure in place with the hex nuts. Tighten the strap around the fuel filter. Lower the Isuzu Rodeo.

Loading ...

Things You'll Need

  • Fuel filter part number ACGF516
  • Two 1/2-inch wrenches
  • Paper towels
  • Gloves
  • Plastic cup
  • Vehicle jack
  • Jack stand

About the Author

Matt Scheer began writing professionally in 2005. His work has appeared in "The Daily Texan" and "The New York Tribune." Scheer holds a B.A. in English and a B.A. in history, both from the University of Texas. He is also a certified Yoga teacher and Web designer.

Loading ...