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Grocery Store List of Gluten-Free Food

Updated November 21, 2016

Following a gluten-free diet can make grocery shopping a challenge. Speed up your grocery shopping by staying away from aisles that contain gluten-filled products such as frozen meals and baked goods. Preparing a shopping list in advance can save you a lot of time and keep you from buying foods that are not part of a gluten-free diet.

Fresh Foods

Following a gluten-free diet does not mean you have to give up taste. Choose from a wide variety of in-season vegetables for optimal nutritional benefit. A mix of fresh vegetables adds colour to any dinner plate. Spinach, broccoli, squash, peas and fresh green beans are just a few of your options. Fruit is also gluten-free and has many nutritional benefits. Try different kinds of fresh fruit to see which you like best.

Grains And Starches

According to Gluten-Free Diet.org, people on a gluten-free diet can eat certain kinds of grains. Some common grains and starches permitted on a gluten-free diet include potatoes, rice, corn, tapioca, beans, quinoa, soy, arrowroot, buckwheat and flours derived from various nuts. Check the cereal aisle for gluten-free hot cereals such as Cream of Rice and Cream of Wheat. Gluten-free bread, crackers and cakes are available in many grocery stores. Purchasing gluten-free bread is a convenient alternative to making your own from scratch, which can be a time-consuming process. Larger grocery stores often have a special section containing only gluten-free goods, which can make shopping quick and easy.

Dairy/Meat

Select gluten-free products from the dairy case in your grocery store. Milk, cheese, cottage cheese, yoghurt and cream are all gluten-free products. However, many people on a gluten-free diet are also lactose intolerant. Soy milk, rice milk and almond milk are good alternatives. Fresh cuts of lean beef, chicken and fish are also allowed a gluten-free diet. Avoid purchasing processed meats or sausage since they often contain gluten. Avoid ready-to-eat meals because they also frequently contain gluten.

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About the Author

Tracy Hodge has been a professional writer since 2007. She currently writes content for various websites, specializing in health and fitness. Hodge also does ghostwriting projects for books, as well as poetry pieces. She has studied nutrition extensively, especially bodybuilding diets and nutritional supplements.