Ada sink height regulations

Written by carl miller
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Ada sink height regulations
The ADA sets a variety of regulations for public rest rooms, including sink measurements. (detail of faucet and sink with running water image by nextrecord from Fotolia.com)

The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) sets out standards and regulations to ensure people with disabilities are allowed equal access to many things able-bodied people take for granted. These include parking spaces, building entrances, hallways and bathrooms. Even the specific heights of rest room fixtures, like sinks, are regulated by the ADA.

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Application

The vast majority of public rest rooms must comply with the accessibility requirements set forth by the ADA. The only exceptions are rest rooms in which it is "technically infeasible" to remodel for ADA compliance. In these instances, however, a separate, unisex rest room must be installed that meets ADA requirements for disabled accessibility.

Sink Height

In most public rest rooms, the counters, or sink rims, must be mounted at a maximum height of 34 inches above the floor. There must also be a space of at least 29 inches between the bottom of the sink and the floor, allowing the approach of a wheelchair. Rest rooms used primarily by children between the ages of 6 and 12 are allowed a sink-to-floor clearance of only 24 inches, but the top of the sink must be no more than 31 inches above the floor. ADA sink-height requirements do not apply to bathrooms used primarily by children under 6 years old.

Knee Clearance

Accounting for any sink undercarriage, or obstacles underneath the sink, there must be a space for "knee clearance" that extends at least 27 inches above the floor. This space must also be at least 30 inches wide and 19 inches deep measured from the front of the sink.

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