Math & Science Groups for Kids

Written by alicia rudnicki
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Math & Science Groups for Kids
Math and science clubs can help students discover the subjects from a new perspective. (class room board image by Alhazm Salemi from Fotolia.com)

Math and science go together, and exploring one is a natural way to reinforce the other. Science activities make math more concrete while math gives kids a concise way to explain science. Extra-curricular science and math groups for children are available as clubs or classes in schools, churches, libraries, community centres and private educational enrichment centres.

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Mad Science Enrichment Classes

Mad Science is an educational enrichment company that offers school assemblies and after-school classes year round throughout the United States and in many countries. Topics include chemistry, crime scene forensics and physics subjects, including Newton's laws of motion.

Mad Science

8360 Bougainville Street, Suite 201

Montreal, QC

Canada H4P 2G1

1-800-586-5231, extension 104

madscience.org

Math & Science Groups for Kids
Math and science complement one another. (glass beakers image by Mark Aplet from Fotolia.com)

Play-Well Engineering Fundamentals

Engineering brings together math and science to make a product. Play-Well TEKnologies offers school assemblies, camps and extra-curricular classes based on Legos blocks. While the preschool class focuses on building themes, such as airports and castles, older kids construct cities, catapults and motorised machines. Play-Well is located in California, Colorado and Washington and appears to be expanding soon to five more U.S. states.

Play-Well TEKnologies

216 Greenfield Avenue

San Anselmo, CA 94960

415-460-5210

play-well.org

Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science

The Institute for Mathematics and Computer Science (IMACS) teaches after-school and weekend enrichment classes as well as summer camps in Connecticut, Florida, Missouri and North Carolina. IMACS emphasises its avoidance of "drill-and- kill" instruction through the use of "fun games, stories and puzzles to teach children logical reasoning and math skills."

IMACS

7435 NW 4th Street

Plantation, FL 33317

866-634-6227

imacs.org

Math & Science Groups for Kids
Games can help kids understand math. (math image by jaddingt from Fotolia.com)

Science Club for Girls

The Science Club for Girls meets after school at state schools, churches and community centres in Cambridge and Newton, Massachusetts. Groups of 8 to 10 girls, from kindergarten to seventh grade, meet with volunteer mentor-scientists and teen aides for classes covering a broad range of sciences. This group's website offers parents in other areas information about how to start a similar club.

Science Club for Girls

P.O. Box 390544

Cambridge, MA 02139

scienceclubforgirls.org

GEMS Club: Girls Excelling in Math and Science

GEMS Club, which is a national movement affiliated with the American Association of University Women, focuses on reversing the trend of girls "opting out of the worlds of math, science and technology." According to the GEMS website, there are now 20 clubs in the United States. For guidelines on how to start one, visit the GEMS website.

AAUW

1111 Sixteenth Street NW

Washington, DC 20036

800-326-AAUW

aauw.org

gemsclub.org

Math & Science Groups for Kids
Clubs encourage girls to try science and math. (science lab image by peter Hires Images from Fotolia.com)

London's Science Museum STEM Clubs

Teachers and other adults in the United Kingdom who are interested in forming a STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) club for children can receive training and resources from The Science Museum, which is based in London's South Kensington area and is 153 years old.

The Science Museum

Exhibition Road

London South Kensington

SW7 2DD

Great Britain

0-870-870-4868

sciencemuseum.org.uk

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