A list of things that hamsters can eat

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A list of things that hamsters can eat
(Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images)

Whether they are stuffing it in their cheeks to eat later or chewing it up right on the spot, hamsters love food. A hamster will eat almost anything you give him. That said, a hamster diet should consist of certain foods. Once you know what to feed a hamster you can be sure you are providing him with the healthiest diet possible.

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Grains

Hamsters should eat grains daily. Offer a mix of grains like buckwheat, flax, oats, bran and wheat germ.

Seeds

Most hamsters like to eat seeds, so most hamster food has grain and seeds mixed together. If you are making your own hamster diet you should include a variety of seeds, such as squash, flax and sesame.

Vegetables

Hamsters should also have a small serving of fresh vegetables each day. However, dark leafy green vegetables should be given sparingly because too much may cause intestinal upset. Most hamsters eat carrots, grass and clover enthusiastically, but other vegetables are suitable as well. Hamsters can eat asparagus, broccoli, bean sprouts, cabbage, celery, cauliflower, corn, cucumbers, green beans, peas, kale, romaine lettuce, spinach, sweet potato, sweet bell pepper, zucchini, squash, water chestnuts, chard, bok choy, chickweed, chicory, parsnips, turnips and watercress.

Protein

Offer your hamster a serving of protein each day. Hamsters can have cooked chicken, turkey or beef, cottage cheese, cooked eggs, tofu, yoghurt, crickets or mealworms.

Fruits

Hamsters love fruit, both dried and fresh. They can have apples, bananas, cantaloupes, cherries, grapes, mango, melon, plums and peaches. You can also give them berries, including strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries and cranberries.

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