The architectural styles of the 1920s and 1930s

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Introduction
  • Introduction

    The architectural styles of the 1920s and 1930s

    The turn of the 20th century brought about a change in architectural styles in the United States. By the 1920s and 1930s, American architects were experimenting with various new design styles. Residential homes reflected everything from Art Deco linear design concepts to Mediterranean stucco homes with tile roofs. The commercial buildings of this time period include arched and columned hotels and churches and modern takes on traditional European designs.

    In the 1920s and 1930s, architecture in America changed significantly. (Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images)

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    Art Deco

    The Art Deco style was a vertically oriented, linear design that became popular after a Paris design exhibition, in 1925. Architects used this style mostly for commercial buildings and less for residential. Many of the buildings had metal window casings, square windows cut from a smooth stucco wall and flat roofs adorned with tall towers. The largest concentration of classic Art Deco commercial buildings in the U.S. is in the South Beach district of Miami, Florida.

    Art Deco tower buildings decorate main streets throughout the U.S. (Medioimages/Photodisc/Photodisc/Getty Images)

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    Craftsman

    By the 1930s, American architects and publisher Gustav Stickley helped popularise Craftsman architecture with interior rooms based around a central living area. The exterior of these homes showcased wide porches with low, gabled roofs that wide-based, stone-clad columns held in place. As the middle class grew during the postwar era, the need for small single-family homes helped the design proliferate throughout the U.S.

    Craftsman style is a much used design for smaller homes. (NA/Photos.com/Getty Images)

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    Tudor Revival

    The Tudor style underwent an American revival in the first part of the century. The mostly residential style included exterior features like steeply pitched roofs with large overhangs and brick or stucco siding. The interiors had oversized fireplaces and arched doorways with ornate hardware. This style remained popular through the 1950s.

    Classic Tudor style architecture underwent an American revival in the 1920s. (Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images)

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    Mediterranean Revival

    During the turn of the 20th century and peaking by the 1920s and 1930s, Americans living along the California and Florida coastal regions became interested in the old-style seaside villas in Italy. The exteriors were built with stucco walls and tile roofs, and adorned with symmetrical facades, arches and large keystones. The style was used for everything from hotels and commercial buildings to modest residential homes.

    Seaside villas were built in the 1930s in the Mediterranean Revival style. (Brand X Pictures/Brand X Pictures/Getty Images)

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