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Which Dogs Have Wrinkled Faces?

Updated November 21, 2016

When choosing a dog breed, aesthetics can sometimes be a factor with some owners who want a dog that is cute or noble-looking. Some people like a breed with a little more physical character, including more unusual-looking ones with wrinkled faces or odd body shapes. Several dog breeds have been bred to have excess loose skin, giving the appearance of wrinkles on the face or even all over the body.

Pug

The pug is an ancient Asian dog breed that dates to at least 400BC. It is a toy breed that grows to between 6.35 and 8.16 Kilogram. The pug has a large head with a flattened muzzle and has, as part of the breed standard, deep, long wrinkles on the face.

Shar-Pei

The Shar-Pei is a large dog breed, growing to almost 2 feet at the shoulder and weighing up to 27.2 Kilogram. It is a hunting and guard dog that originated in China where its distinctive look is thought to ward off evil spirits. The dog has loose skin folds covering its entire body and has a deeply wrinkled face.

Bulldog

The bulldog is a short-legged, sturdy dog that originated in the United Kingdom. Its flat face is an adaptation bred for its former purpose in bull baiting. The sport has long been illegal, and modern-day bulldogs have had the aggressive traits bred out. The jowls and loose skin around the face give it a wrinkled appearance.

French Bulldog

The French bulldog was selectively bred by British lacemakers in the 19th century from the bulldog to create a toy class breed. During the Industrial Revolution, the making of lace was moved to France along with it the dog breed. It is smaller and more slender than the bulldog, but has the same jowled face with loose, wrinkled skin.

Mastiff

The mastiff is one of the biggest dog breeds, dating to 3,000 B.C. It is a heavy, powerful animal with a huge head, jowled cheeks and copious loose skin, creating wrinkles. There are several breeds of mastiffs, all of which generally have wrinkled skin in the area of the face.

Bloodhound

The bloodhound dates to Medieval Europe, where it was bred as a hunting and tracking dog. It is still used for its excellent sense of smell and tracking abilities. The breed has copious amounts of loose skin all over its body, especially in the face, giving it a deep wrinkled appearance.

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