What Are Satin Balls?

Written by nicole papagiorgio
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What Are Satin Balls?
Satin balls are made of minced meat. (Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Satin balls are a meat-based homemade food for dogs that is fed as a treat, as a food supplement or in an effort to help the dog gain weight. Some satin ball recipes include added supplements, which make the satin balls appropriate as a staple dog food for dogs eating a raw diet. Satin balls are sometimes referred to as fat balls or hamburger balls.

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Significance

Satin balls are fattening, which is why they are offered to dogs that need to gain weight. They have also gained popularity as a homemade dog treat. Many pet owners may need to put weight on their dog if it is too thin or the vet recommends increasing its weight for breeding purposes, and satin balls can be considered a holistic alternative to expensive commercial foods designed to help dogs gain weight.

Ingredients

Satin balls are usually composed of raw regular, full-fat minced meat and oatmeal as the two main ingredients, but ground chicken and turkey can also be used. Various recipes also incorporate vegetable oil, salt, raw eggs (including shells), grain-based cereals, molasses and supplements such as wheat germ, flax oil, kelp extract or commercial dog supplement powders (see Resources).

Method

Satin ball ingredients are combined to make a meat loaf-like final product that remains raw and is fed to the dog raw. The satin balls can be formed into balls similar to making meatballs that are about 1-inch wide and then frozen for storage. Before feeding the satin balls to a dog, they are thawed out.

Warning

Ensure your dog has been exposed to beef or any substituted meat before feeding it homemade satin balls. Dogs who have not had beef before may have an allergic reaction when they are exposed to a new protein for the first time. Dog owners should also take their dogs to the vet for annual checkups to ensure the dog is a healthy weight for its age and breed or to determine if a dog needs to gain or lose weight.

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