What are the duties of the church's first lady?

Written by mitchell brock
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A church's first lady is commonly the senior pastor's wife. A position of authority such as this requires the first lady to perform a host of duties. Most of the duties and responsibilities are over areas of the church that concern the females of the congregation.

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Support

The most important duty of the church's first lady is supporting the senior pastor. The support she provides includes following the pastor's instructions, openly agreeing with his decisions and encouraging the pastor. The Bible instructs the first lady to submit to her husband in all decisions. Along with supporting her husband, the first lady of the church must conduct herself with reverence in her behaviour.

Teach

The first lady of the church is responsible for teaching the ladies of the congregation all aspects of church life and conduct. This includes teaching classes in marriage, conduct of a single woman, spirituality of a woman in the church and other areas of interest to the females of the congregation. All classes taught to women of the church require the first lady to approve and oversee their instruction.

Lead

A duty of the church's first lady is leading the other females in the congregation by example. A first lady acts according to God's word and portrays this behaviour in order for other females to emulate. Challenging the female parishioner to improve their own spirituality as well as behaviour toward others is a duty of the first lady.

Counsel

The first lady of the church counsels the women in private meetings and must instruct these women in God's word. Biblical counselling involves instruction through what the Bible states about behaviour, conduct and actions. Every first lady must know the word of God in order to properly counsel the female parishioners.

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