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How to Write Fashion Journalism

Updated July 20, 2017

Fashion journalists report on the newest trends and shows, taking advantage of the Internet, blogs, magazines and newspapers. They critique, criticise and reveal. Although becoming a fashion journalist requires knowledge of the industry, journalism skills and techniques are the most vital components. With a an eye for fashion, an ability to network and a knack for writing, fashion journalism can be a rewarding career.

Research the event or trend you would like to report on. Collect and record any important or interesting facts. If you are reporting on a fashion show, find a way to attend if possible.

Conduct interviews with designers, fashion enthusiasts or anyone that might be relevant to your article.

Snap or collect photos of clothing that relate to your topic. Refer to these images when writing.

Determine the angle you want to approach the story with, as well as your audience.

Write the opening of your article. Include the time, date and place if you are reporting on an event, and the season and year if you are reporting on a trend.

Write the main bulk of your article. Discuss details of the garments you are reporting. Include both concrete facts, such as fabric, as well as abstract ideas, such as the vibe.

Conclude your article with your own opinions or predictions. This gives your writing character, and distinguishes you from other journalists reporting on the same topic.

Tip

Write like a journalist, not a fashionista. The industry looks for those who have received a solid education in writing, so earn a degree in journalism and later become an expert in fashion through work experience. Know at least basic level fashion terminology. You need to be able to describe clothing accurately. Always include details such as materials, accessories and designers' names, but refrain from rambling. Network respectfully and thoughtfully. The top of the fashion industry is a small world, and you likely will run into the people you meet more than once. Always send a thank-you note to anyone you interview.

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About the Author

Anna Tiner has worked in graphic design and writes on various topics, specializing in art, crafts and video games. She is pursuing her Bachelor of Arts in communication at the University of California, Santa Barbara.