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How to Moisten Cooked Meat

Updated March 16, 2017

Meat naturally loses some of its juiciness after it is cooked, and becomes even more dry if overcooked. Lean meats are susceptible to drying because the meat lacks the necessary fat to keep the meat succulent and tasty. Dried meat becomes stringy and sinewy, making it hard to eat and enjoy. You can add juiciness and flavour in just a few steps. If you suspect a lean cut of meat may dry out, you should braise it on a low-heat. If you've already prepared your dish, use gravies and juices to add moisture.

Place 1 cup of water and one bouillon cube in a large saucepan. Turn the heat on low-medium. If moistening chicken, add a chicken-flavoured cube to the water. If adding moisture to beef, use a beef-flavoured cube. For pork, use either kind of bouillon cube.

Add slices of meat to the flavoured bouillon and place the lid on top. Simmer the meat, allowing the meat to moisten for at least 15 minutes.

Place the meat on a serving platter and spoon the juice over the meat.

Heat shredded meat and one standard bottle size of barbecue sauce to a medium-sized saucepan.

Turn the heat to medium and stir the meat in the sauce until it is saturated. Heat the barbecue for 10 to 20 minutes.

Thicken the barbecue by adding 1/4 cup of brown sugar. This will make your cooked meat and sauce thicker.

Tip

Baste meat with butter and place it under the grill for one minute before serving.

Things You'll Need

  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 bouillion cube
  • Large saucepan
  • Meat
  • Large spoon
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About the Author

When not working in her family-owned food and bar business, Viola Horne can almost always be found with a cookbook in one hand and a whisk in the other. Horne never tires of entertaining family and friends with both comfort food and unusual delicacies such as garlic cheese smashed potatoes and banana bacon pancakes.