How to Make Shealoe Butter

Written by chelsea hoffman Google
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How to Make Shealoe Butter
Aloe vera adds softening and soothing benefits to shea butter. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Shealoe butter takes advantage of smooth shea butter with aloe vera. Used in homemade soaps, lotions and other body applications, shealoe butter can be made with raw ingredients obtained from a craft supply store. When you know how to make your own shealoe butter, you are able to soften your skin, strengthen your hair and sooth scrapes and itches with the aloe vera and cosmetic properties of shea.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • 85.1gr. shea butter
  • 35.4gr. aloe vera gel
  • 2 quart mixing bowl
  • Stirring wand
  • 113gr. storage bowl

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Warm the shea butter in the 2 quart bowl in the microwave for 30 seconds. Do not heat it into a liquid state. If it melts into a liquid, remove it from the microwave and let it air-cool until it is slightly solid.

  2. 2

    Squirt the concentrated aloe vera gel into the bowl of warmed, softened shea butter. Aloe gel will emulsify with the oily butter base.

  3. 3

    Stir the contents of the bowl with a quick pace for two whole minutes. Make sure to scrape the edges of the bowl and blend the shea butter with the aloe gel as much as possible. The end result will be a creamy, slightly softer butter.

  4. 4

    Scoop the slightly warm concoction from the bowl into a plastic storage container such as a plastic food container with a snap-on lid. Refrigerate your homemade shealoe butter for up to a year.

Tips and warnings

  • Use shealoe butter no differently than any other cosmetic vegetable butter. If a recipe calls for 1 tbsp of coco butter, you can still use a whole tbsp of this homemade soft butter. It's creamy and rich.

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