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How to get rid of pollen from the nose

Pollen allergies can leave you feeling miserable and exhausted. Runny nose, sneezing, watery eyes and headaches are just a few of the symptoms that affect those with pollen allergies. Tiny particles of pollen from trees and flowers become airborne, making it easy for them to be inhaled. When you have pollen in your nose it can exacerbate allergy symptoms. Although natural mucus secretions will work to remove the pollen, simple procedures can also help you get rid of pollen in the nose.

Blow your nose gently into a facial tissue to get rid of the pollen in your nose. Repeat this a few times in an effort to remove the pollen.

Squirt a commercial nasal saline spray into the nostril with pollen. Insert the tip of the spray container one-half inch or so into the nostril. Spray one or two times to help clean out the nasal cavity. Wait a minute, then blow your nose gently.

Irrigate the nasal cavity with a neti pot. Fill a neti pot with warm saline solution. Insert the tip of the neti pot into one nostril and turn that nostril up toward the ceiling. Slowly drain the neti pot into the nasal cavity. Position yourself over a sink so the saline solution can drip out of the other nostril, into the sink. Dry your face off with a clean towel, then repeat with the other nostril.

Tip

Wear a face mask to protect yourself from inhaling pollen. Keep windows and doors closed during the peak of pollen season. Preventing the tiny pollen particles from entering your home will help you keep them out of your nose. Sneezing is the nose's way of getting rid of foreign matter. Don't stifle a sneeze, rather grab a tissue and sneeze away.

Things You'll Need

  • Facial tissues
  • Nasal saline solution
  • Neti pot
  • Towel
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About the Author

Mary Ylisela is a former teacher with a Bachelor of Arts in elementary education and mathematics. She has been a writer since 1996, specializing in business, fitness and education. Prior to teaching, Ylisela worked as a certified fitness instructor and a small-business owner.