How to Make Silestone Shiny

Written by april dowling
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Known for their irrefutable durability and diverse styles, Silestone surfaces outlast most interior surfaces. Silestone is composed mainly of natural quartz, which is nonporous and extremely hard. Silestone, like all surfaces, inevitably accumulates residue and grime fragments that dull its sheen. Fortunately, Silestone does not require sealers to restore its lustre. Simply cleaning Silestone regularly preserves its shiny, luxurious appearance for many decades and protects the surface from damage. You can quickly make drab Silestone shiny again using simple techniques.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Commercial all-purpose household cleaner
  • Clean dishrag
  • Clean dishtowel
  • Multi-purpose furniture polish
  • Clean terrycloth towel

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Spray a commercial all-purpose household cleaner liberally onto the Silestone surface. Always use mild cleaners on Silestone.

  2. 2

    Saturate a clean dishrag with clean, warm water. Wipe the wet dishrag over the Silestone surface to remove grime, stains and residue. Rinse the dishrag frequently in warm, flowing water to prevent spreading the grime back across the Silestone.

  3. 3

    Dry the Silestone thoroughly with a clean dishtowel.

  4. 4

    Examine the Silestone for lustre. Spray multipurpose furniture polish liberally over the Silestone if the surface remains slightly dull.

  5. 5

    Buff the Silestone with a clean terrycloth towel until the surface gleams. Wipe up all of the furniture polish.

Tips and warnings

  • Substitute a combination of 1 tsp dish soap and 1 gallon warm water for the commercial all-purpose household cleaner.
  • Harsh solvents and chemicals including products containing methylene chloride or trichlorethane permanently damage Silestone surfaces.

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