How to Draw the Greek God Poseidon

Written by ashley mott Google
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In Greek mythology, Poseidon was most prominently known as the god of the sea and the brother of Zeus who was god of the sky. Poseidon was also the god of horses and earthquakes within Greek mythology. When you attempt to draw a picture of Poseidon, these particular elements can be incorporated into the picture in several different ways to lend clarity to your sketch or line-art interpretation.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Draw Poseidon's body. Poseidon is depicted as a large-bodied and muscular man, so he should have a broad chest area, thick legs and big arms. A line-art drawing should feature outlines of major musculature at the quadriceps, biceps and abdominal areas, while a full sketch would feature more detailed shadows and highlights of all muscle groups visible in the drawing

  2. 2

    Draw Poseidon's face. Poseidon is typically depicted with a square jaw and strong, chiselled facial features much like his brother Zeus. When the face is complete, add a full head of hair and a beard and moustache.

  3. 3

    Add a trident to one of Poseidon's hands. The trident is one of the items that allows viewers to readily identify any picture of the god of the sea.

  4. 4

    Add horses to your picture if you not doing a portrait-only drawing as this is another consistent element in depictions of Poseidon. Sometimes the horses are pulling a seashell carriage and emerging from crashing waves, while other times they are depicted with a combination of a horse's head and front legs and a seahorse-like tail section.

Tips and warnings

  • Poseidon is rarely depicted as clothed. Occasionally, a slight drape or a strategically placed wave will cover Poseidon for the sake of propriety, but traditional clothing should be avoided in your drawing.

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