How to make a mood ring for kids that naturally changes colors

Written by chelsea oliver
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Mood rings were developed by Marvin Wernick in the 1960s, who used heat-sensitive thermotropic paper combined with glass gemstones. Quite popular in the 1970s, Wernick advertised that these rings measure your mood and change colour based on your body temperature. For example, dark blue is said to represent happiness, while an amber mood ring means the wearer is nervous. While mood rings do not accurately portray mood, children delight in learning about and wearing the rings.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Adjustable ring with flat base
  • Heat-sensitive stone
  • Hot glue gun
  • Glue sticks
  • Newspaper

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Purchase a heat-sensitive stone such as the DaMert Spectra Stone or the Star Magic Touchstone Liquid Crystal. These can be ordered online or purchased from your local toy store.

  2. 2

    Buy an adjustable ring with a flat base online or from a local craft store. The flat base, situated at the top of the ring, is where you glue the heat-sensitive stone.

  3. 3

    Lay down newspaper to protect your workspace from any drips of hot glue. Plug in a glue gun and allow it to heat up before inserting a glue stick.

  4. 4

    Glue the heat-sensitive stone to the flat base of the adjustable ring. Use a small dollop of glue and hold the stone and the ring together firmly for several minutes.

  5. 5

    Allow your homemade mood ring to dry completely. This should take one to two hours, before giving it to your kids to enjoy.

Tips and warnings

  • Exercise caution when working with a hot glue gun.

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