How to Write a Post-Seminar Report

Written by jody hanson
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How to Write a Post-Seminar Report
Take time to reflect before you write your post-seminar report. (Group of business people working together in the office. image by Andrey Kiselev from Fotolia.com)

Writing a post-seminar report is best done after some reflection. Rather than coming out of the seminar and heading for your laptop, let the information settle for a while so you can put it into perspective. Writing a post-seminar report is a good way to synthesise your learning experience and identify what you gained from the session. It is also an opportunity for you to think about the next step in your continuing educational development.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Review the notes you took during the seminar. If you forgot to take any, quickly jot down points you remember.

  2. 2

    Open a new word processing document, set your margins at least an inch on both sides and select Times New Roman, Bookman or Courier for your font. If you are writing on company letterhead, drop down an inch. Identify yourself, your position and the seminar you attended. Also include details such as date and the place the seminar was held.

  3. 3

    Create a subheading with the title of "Introduction." Write a few sentences that put the seminar in context. If, for example, the seminar was to explain how to set up a doctoral program or how to improve sales, outline the reason it was held.

  4. 4

    Make another subheading for "Seminar Content." Focus on the essence of the seminar. Identify the salient points of what you learnt and comment on what resonated well with you. Be objective about whether the seminar delivered what it claimed it would.

  5. 5

    Use another subheading for "Evaluation and Recommendations." Provide an overall evaluation of the seminar and suggest what you think could make it better. Suggest further education that logically follows on from what you learnt.

  6. 6

    Write your draft and leave it for a day or two. Return to your report about the seminar and check it against your original notes to make sure you didn't overlook anything.

  7. 7

    Ask a friend or colleague with good editing skills to review your draft. Having a second reader look at your work is always a good idea, as she will spot things that you may miss.

  8. 8

    Print your seminar report. Attach a copy of the seminar outline, if appropriate.

Tips and warnings

  • Another option is to download a report template, if you think it would make writing your post-seminar account easier.

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