How to Place an Aquatic Plant in a Bottle

Written by kimberly johnson
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Aquatic plants grow in ponds, water gardens and other areas of water. Although they appear to float in the water, these plants have long root systems that are actually anchored into the soil under the water. You can create a miniature water garden using a clear plastic bottle. Planting aquatic plants in the bottle is similar to planting nonaquatic plants, although a higher amount of water is required in the bottle.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • 2-liter soda bottle
  • Utility knife
  • Small stones
  • Activated charcoal
  • Spaghnum moss
  • Clay-based soil
  • Aquatic plants
  • Water

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Rinse out a clear, two-liter soda bottle and then lay it on its side on a nonskid surface. Cut around the perimeter of the bottle, at least four to five inches from the top of the bottle, using a utility knife.

  2. 2

    Set aside the top potion of the bottle and place a one-inch layer of small stones in the bottom of the bottle.

  3. 3

    Add a half-inch layer of activated charcoal on top of the stones to prevent bacteria build-up in the bottle, and then add a one-inch layer of spaghnum moss on top of the charcoal. Finally, add four to five inches of a heavy, clay-based soil to the bottle.

  4. 4

    Dig a two- to three-inch-deep hole in the soil and place the roots of your aquatic plant into the hole. Add more soil until the roots are completely covered but the top of the plant remains uncovered.

  5. 5

    Pour water in the bottle until it pools up above the soil line. The water level can be as high as the bottle height permits, but it should not cover the top of the aquatic plants.

  6. 6

    Insert the top of the bottle back over the lower portion and push it down until the sides slip inside the lower portion by half an inch.

  7. 7

    Set the bottle in a location that receives bright sun but not in direct sunlight, which causes excessive heat.

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