How to Make an Alto Sax Stand With PVC

Written by owen e. richason iv
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How to Make an Alto Sax Stand With PVC
Alto sax stands can be bought pre-assembled or you can make your own. (sax closeup image by Andrey Kiselev from Fotolia.com)

The alto sax or saxophone is part of the woodwind section and a member of the saxophone family. There are eight members of the saxophone family: the sopranino, the soprano, the alto, the tenor, the baritone, the bass, the contrabass and the subcontrabass. Alto saxophonists wishing to have easy access to their instrument can construct a sturdy and professional-looking stand using PVC piping, PVC joints and black felt.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • 9 feet of 3/4-inch PVC piping
  • 1 4-way Side Outlet PVC tee
  • 1 PVC tee
  • 2 90-degree PVC elbows
  • 5 PVC caps
  • Black felt
  • Plumber's glue
  • Hacksaw

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Cut a 4-foot piece of 3/4-inch PVC piping with a hacksaw, set it aside. Then cut three 1-foot pieces of PVC piping.

  2. 2

    Insert the three 1-foot pipes to a 4-way side outlet PVC tee to create a three-pronged "foot." Glue them into place using plumber's glue. Allow the glue to adhere and fix.

  3. 3

    Insert and glue the 4-foot piece into the top of the 4-way side outlet PVC tee and then cap the opposing end with a PVC tee. Let the glue dry.

  4. 4

    Cut two 5-inch and two 7-inch pieces of PVC. Insert and glue the 5-inch pieces into the PVC tee. Place one PVC 90-degree elbow on either side. Then insert the two 7-inch pieces into the open ends of the 90-degree tees; glue them to affix them in place.

  5. 5

    Place PVC caps on the open ends of the PVC pipes located on the three-pronged foot and two protruding forks at the top of the stand.

  6. 6

    Cover the PVC stand in felt and glue the black felt into place.

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