How to Use Fondant Molds

Written by melinda gaines
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Fondant is a creamy paste made of sugar and water that is most often used to decorate cakes and other confections. Fondant can be coloured, flavoured and even moulded in a variety of ways. Most fondant moulds are made of silicone, which makes removing the finished decorations easy. There are two types of fondant moulds: those that imprint designs, and those that make three-dimensional fondant pieces. It is fairly easy to use either type of fondant mould.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Clean and dry your fondant moulds thoroughly in warm water with mild dishwashing liquid. Let the moulds air dry; if there is any wetness on them, your finished fondant pieces will not turn out properly.

  2. 2

    Add colouring, if you desire, to your fondant before using it with a mould. Aside from painting details, you will not be able to colour the fondant without ruining its design after releasing it from the mould.

  3. 3

    Get your fondant to room temperature, and ensure that it is pliable before moulding it.

  4. 4

    Roll out your fondant to ¼-inch thickness, if using a rolled fondant mould. Gently pick up the rolled-out fondant and place it on top of your mould. Firmly press it against the moulding plate to transfer the design, and then lift off fondant and use it immediately for decoration.

  5. 5

    Read the instructions accompanying your cavity fondant mould to see how much fondant should be placed inside of it. After inserting the correct amount of fondant, close the mould or firmly pack the fondant inside. Gently slide the fondant out of the cavity mould, ensuring that you do not squeeze it and distort the design.

Tips and warnings

  • Brush pearl or glitter dust onto rolled or cavity moulded fondant to highlight the finished pieces.

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