How to Use a Torque Angle Gauge

Written by brad chacos
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How to Use a Torque Angle Gauge
Torque angle gauges enable uniform bolt-tightening. (bolt image by martini from Fotolia.com)

Bolts, nuts and fasteners often recommend or require certain amounts of torque during application to ensure a tight fit and prevent possible part failure. "Cars Direct" says torque angle gauges are used specifically to ensure that each component of the fastener has an equal amount of tightness.

Torque wrenches measure torque using pounds per foot, which cannot account for friction in the threads of the fastener. On the other hand, torque angle gauges measure the torque angle, rather than pounds per foot, which removes any possible friction errors. Torque measurements are important when repairing any plumbing or ventilation systems.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Torque wrench
  • Torque angle gauge
  • Fastener

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Find the manufacturer's suggested torque rating for the fastener on the part's box or accompanying paperwork. "CDXeTextbook" says the measurement will often be in foot-pounds, or Newton meters, and that torque angle degree specifications will also be listed.

  2. 2

    Place the torque angle gauge over the head of the bolt.

  3. 3

    Tighten the gauge and fastener with the torque wrench while watching the torque meter on the angle gauge.

  4. 4

    Stop tightening the fastener when the specified torque degree value is reached on the torque meter.

  5. 5

    Remove the torque angle gauge from the fastener.

  6. 6

    Repeat for other fasteners or bolts on the component, ensuring that all are tightened to the same degree.

Tips and warnings

  • Tightening fasteners on the same component to differing degrees of torque could possibly cause the seals to break and result in severe damage to the component itself.

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