How to Enlarge a PST File

Written by chris loza
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PST stands for Personal Store, which is Microsoft Outlook's personal folders file. It contains all the mails you have moved from your Inbox to the Archived folder in Outlook. PST file sizes have absolute maximum limits depending on the version of Microsoft Outlook. Outlook 2010 has an absolute limit of 50GB, while Outlook 2003 and 2007 have an absolute limit of 20GB. This means that the PST file size cannot be expanded beyond these limits. By default, however, PST file size limits are set only to 2GB regardless of the Outlook version.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Administrator privileges
  • Registry Editor (regedit.exe)

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Instructions

    Editing PST File Size Limit in the Registry

  1. 1

    Click "Start," then "Run." (If "Run" is not present at the "Start" menu, click "All Programs," then "Accessories," then "Command Prompt.")

  2. 2

    Type: regedit, then press "Enter."

  3. 3

    Expand "HKEY_CURRENT_USER" and go to "Software," then "Policies," then "Microsoft" then "Office." Expand "11.0" if you're using Outlook 2003, "12.0" if you're using Outlook 2007 or "14.0" if you're using Outlook 2010. Then Expand "Outlook."

  4. 4

    Click "PST, then double-click "MaxFileSize" on the right window pane. Enter "0x0000C800" in the "Value data" if you're using Outlook 2010. Enter "0x00005000" if you're using Outlook 2003 or Outlook 2007. Make sure that the "Base" is set to Hexadecimal because these are the hexadecimal equivalents of 50GB and 20GB, respectively. Click "OK."

  5. 5

    Find the registry "MaxLargeFileSize" and enter the same values as in step 4 for Outlook 2010 or Outlook 2003 and 2007. Click "OK."

  6. 6

    Find the "WarnFileSize" registry entry in the same window pane and double-click it. Type: 0x0000BE00 if you're using Outlook 2010 or 0x00004C00 if you're using Outlook 2003 or 2007. These hexadecimal values are equivalent to 47.5GB and 19GB, respectively, or 95 per cent of the absolute maximum. Click "OK."

  7. 7

    Find the "WarnLargeFileSize" and enter the same value as in step 6 for either Outlook 2010 or Outlook 2003 and 2007. Click "OK." Reboot your computer for the changes to take effect.

    Creating the PST File Size Limit in the Registry

  1. 1

    Click "Start," then "Run." (If "Run" is not present at the "Start" menu, click "All Programs," then "Accessories," then "Command Prompt.")

  2. 2

    Type: regedit, then press "Enter."

  3. 3

    Expand "HKEY_CURRENT_USER" and go to "Software," then "Policies," then "Microsoft" then "Office." Expand "11.0" if you're using Outlook 2003, "12.0" if you're using Outlook 2007 or "14.0" if you're using Outlook 2010. Then Expand "Outlook."

  4. 4

    Right-click on the right window pane, click "New," then click "Key." Type "PST," then hit "Enter."

  5. 5

    Right-click again on the right window pane, click "New," then click "DWORD (32-bit) value."

  6. 6

    Type "MaxFileSize" and hit "Enter" twice. Type: 0x0000C800 if you're using Outlook 2010 or 0x00005000 if you're using Outlook 2003 or 2007. Make sure that the "Base" is set to Hexadecimal.

  7. 7

    Repeat steps 5 and 6. Type "MaxLargeFileSize" this time instead of "MaxFileSize." Use the same hexadecimal values for Outlook 2010 or Outlook 2003 and 2007.

  8. 8

    Repeat step 5, then type "WarnFileSize" and hit "Enter" twice. Type: 0x0000BE00 if you're using Outlook 2010 or 0x00004C00 if you're using Outlook 2003 or 2007. Make sure that the "Base" is set to Hexadecimal. Click "OK."

  9. 9

    Repeat step 8, but type "WarnLargeFileSize" instead of "WarnFileSize." Use the same values for Outlook 2010 or Outlook 2003 and 2007. Click "OK." Reboot your computer.

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