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How to Do a Complete System Restore on a Toshiba

Updated July 20, 2017

On older Toshiba models, a full system restore can only be performed using a recovery disk--on newer models there is an inbuilt recovery partition that can be used to perform a system restore. A full system restore puts the computer in its "out-of-box" state and can be used to fix a wide range of problems, such as viruses or even corrupt system files. A system restore deletes all personal data, therefore it is vital that you back up any data you wish to keep before executing the restore.

Back up all important data you do not wish to lose onto an external drive. Performing a full system restore deletes all data. When you are sure all of your data is backed up, shut down your computer.

Boot your computer, and during set-up press and hold the zero key. The "Toshiba Recovery Wizard" screen will open. Check the box next to "Recovery of Factory Default Software" and click "Next." Click "Recover to Out-of-Box State" and click "Next."

Click "OK" when asked if you are sure you want to perform full system recovery. Wait for the recovery console to complete and press any key to restart. You have successfully performed a full system restore.

Turn on your computer. While it is setting up, hold down F12. The "Boot Options" menu will open.

Select "CD/DVD" and press "Enter." Your computer will restart.

Follow the on-screen instructions to start the recovery. Wait for the recovery to complete and press any key to restart your computer. You have successfully performed a full system restore.

Warning

Ensure all data is backed up before performing a full system restore as all personal data will be lost.

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About the Author

Edward Zehtab began writing in 2005 and was awarded with the Sawston Creative Young Writer's Award in 2008. His areas of expertise include life sciences, graphics and networking. Zehtab is pursuing a Bachelor of Science in biology at the University of Warwick and plans to write articles discussing medicine and computing.