How to Repair a Tubeless Clincher Bicycle Tire

Written by justin wash
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Tubeless clincher bicycle tires are becoming more and more prominent in the bicycle industry. They are lighter, provide better traction through the ability to run lower tire pressures reliably, and are easy to install and replace. However, if you're out on a ride and get a flat on a tubeless clincher tire, you may be stuck without another means of getting home. Unless you happen to carry a spare tire in your back pocket, it can be almost impossible to reinflate a broken tubeless tire. Fortunately, tubeless tires can be fitted with normal bicycle tubes so you can ride safely home.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Inner tube
  • Hand-held pump
  • Tire boot
  • Tire lever

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Release the quick-release skewer of the wheel with the broken tire. Slide the wheel out of the dropouts of the frame and lay the rest of your bike in a safe area.

  2. 2

    Wedge a tire lever between the tire and rim of your flat wheel. Pull the tire lever down toward the hub to separate the tire from the rim. Pull it away and empty any sealant still inside on the ground. Clean out the inside of the tire, using a rag, leaf or anything else you have on hand.

  3. 3

    Remove the adhesive backing of the tire boot and stick it to the inside of the tire where the puncture occurred. Allow the boot to set for five minutes before continuing.

  4. 4

    Set one bead of the tire back on the rim. Insert the valve of the tube you are using to fix the tire into the valve hole on the rim. Push the tube into the tire all the way around the rim, then set the second bead of the tire onto the rim by hand. If at any point the tire gets too difficult to set, use a tire lever to wedge it into place carefully so as not to damage the new tube.

  5. 5

    Attach a hand pump to the valve of the new tube and inflate the tire to the recommended pressure printed on its sidewall. Set the wheel back into the frame dropouts of the bike and secure the quick release, then enjoy the rest of your ride without worry.

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