How to build a passive crossover for a speaker

Written by william kinsey
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
How to build a passive crossover for a speaker
Crossovers direct low frequencies to subwoofers. (speaker element image by bright from Fotolia.com)

Speakers are available in a wide range of sizes and shapes. Each speaker is designed to operate and reproduce a certain frequency range of sound. Speakers designed to handle high frequencies are called tweeters. The middle frequencies, including voice frequencies, are handled by mid-range speakers. The low frequencies are handled by woofers and subwoofers. Crossover networks are used to direct a certain frequency range to the speaker that can best reproduce it.

Skill level:
Moderate

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • Inductors
  • Capacitors
  • Speaker wire
  • Wire strippers
  • Wire cutters

Show MoreHide

Instructions

  1. 1

    Use a crossover design program or a crossover design table to determine what values the inductors and capacitors will need to be to get the crossover points needed. The crossover points determine where the frequency spectrum is divided.

  2. 2

    Look at the subwoofer. Connect one side of the chosen inductor to the negative terminal of the subwoofer. Connect the positive terminal of the subwoofer to the positive speaker terminal of the amplifier. Connect the negative speaker terminal of the amplifier to the second terminal of the inductor. The inductor is in series with the subwoofer for this set-up. This is a low pass filter.

  3. 3

    Look at the tweeter. Connect one side of the chosen capacitor to the negative terminal of the tweeter. Connect the positive terminal of the tweeter to the positive speaker terminal of the amplifier. Connect the negative speaker terminal of the amplifier to the second terminal of the capacitor. This is a high pass filter.

  4. 4

    Look at the mid-range speaker next. Connect one side of the chosen inductor to one side of the chosen capacitor. Connect the other side of the capacitor to the negative terminal of the mid-range. Connect the positive terminal of the mid-range to the positive speaker terminal of the amplifier. Connect the negative speaker terminal of the amplifier to the second terminal of the inductor. In this set-up, the mid-range, capacitor and inductor are all in series. This creates a bandpass filter.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.