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How to Reference Meeting Minutes

Updated March 23, 2017

Meeting minutes are notes taken by a chosen person during a meeting. This person then is responsible for translating the notes into a report and sending it out to participants and those who missed the meeting. Employers often need to reference the meeting minutes, as procedures, goals and strategies are some of the things discussed during a meeting. Use MLA (Modern Language Association) style when referencing meeting minutes, since it is a common referencing guide.

Write the company's name and the specific page number from the meeting minutes when citing a direct quotation. Write it in brackets, such as "(Company Name, XX)."

Include how the reference from the meeting minutes relates to the report you are writing. For example, if you are referencing something Mr. Smith said during the meeting, write down Mr. Smith's suggestions or ideas. When you are done explaining that, reference the paragraph using the citation method in the previous step. This way, the proper person is credited with her idea.

Create a footnote if the reference is more than a simple quotation. For example, if the entire meeting minutes report is used as a reference, write this information in a footnote and list the meeting minutes in the bibliography section.

Write the name of the company that held the meeting. After the name, place a period.

Write the title of the meeting in italics. For example, the meeting could be an update on the production numbers, a brainstorming session on implementing marketing strategies or an annual financial summary discussion. Put a period after the title.

Write the date of the meeting, starting with the date and month, followed by the year. The proper format should be "5 November 2008." As in the example, add a period at the end.

Double-check that the reference is correct. It should look like this: "Company X. Marketing Implementation Strategies. 5 November 2008."

Things You'll Need

  • Meeting minutes report
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About the Author

Based in Toronto, Mary Jane has been writing for online magazines and databases since 2002. Her articles have appeared on the Simon & Schuster website and she received an editor's choice award in 2009. She holds a Master of Arts in psychology of language use from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark.