How to Create a Relative Hyperlink in Powerpoint 2007

Written by craig witt
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How to Create a Relative Hyperlink in Powerpoint 2007
Quickly create a relative hyperlink in your Microsoft PowerPoint 2007 presentation. (laptop image by Manika from Fotolia.com)

Microsoft PowerPoint is one of the world's most widely used presentation applications. Included as part of the Microsoft Office of productivity products, PowerPoint allows users to create slide-based presentations populated with text, images, sounds, animations, transitions and more. Because of a program quirk, a relative hyperlink added to your PowerPoint 2007 presentation may not always function as expected. Once you know how to properly place linked files, working around this quirk and adding a relative hyperlink becomes a quick task.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Place the file associated with your relative hyperlink (e.g., sound clip, PDF document) in the same folder as your PowerPoint 2007 presentation. Files placed in any other folder are automatically converted to absolute links by PowerPoint.

  2. 2

    Open your PowerPoint 2007 presentation.

  3. 3

    Highlight the block of text or image you want to use as the link object.

  4. 4

    Right-click the highlighted item and select "Hyperlink."

  5. 5

    Select the "Existing File or Web Page" option on the left-hand side of the resulting dialogue box.

  6. 6

    Locate the file to which you want to link and then double-click the file's icon to place the link. The relative link is maintained as long as the linked file stays in the same folder as the PowerPoint presentation.

Tips and warnings

  • Make sure to keep both your presentation and linked files in the same folder when transferring the content to another computer. The presentation and files must reside in a common folder location or your relative links will no longer work.

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