How to make chairs taller

Written by amanda flanigan Google
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
How to make chairs taller
Adding height to chairs can be done with a few simple techniques. (chairs image by Antonio Oquias from Fotolia.com)

Finding chairs at the ideal height can be difficult. Raising the height of chairs can help those having difficulty getting out of low chairs, as well as bringing the chair up to level with tables and bars. Some simple solutions will help you add height to your chairs without having to purchase all new furniture. These options can be done relatively quickly without investing much money into the project.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • Padded chair cushions
  • Chair raisers
  • Coasters
  • Drill
  • Wood glue
  • Hammer

Show MoreHide

Instructions

  1. 1

    Place thick padded or foam cushions to the chair seats. Chair cushions can be purchased at local department stores in a variety of designs and prices. Most chair cushions feature ties attached to the cushion so you can secure it to the back of the chair.

  2. 2

    Add raisers to the feet of your chair. Raisers are available in different sizes and heights. Purchase the height you need to achieve the desired results. Installing the raiser can be achieved by simply placing a raiser under each chair leg. Because chair raisers sit just under the chair, however, it may be difficult to move the chairs from one place to another without having to reset the raisers back under the legs.

  3. 3

    Attach chair casters to the bottom of wood chair legs. Chair casters are wheels that are screwed into the bottom of chair legs. The casters will not only add height, but they will give your chair the ability to be mobile. According to CasterCity.com, you must purchase the correct type of caster depending on the surface on which the chair will be used. To install the casters you must drill a starting hole into the bottom of the chair leg with a drill. Make sure the starting hole is slightly smaller than the caster shaft's circumference. Depending on the type of caster you purchased, you will either need to place a small amount of wood glue into the starting hole and gently tap the caster into place using a hammer or--if your caster is a screw-in type--push the caster into the hole while twisting to screw into the leg.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.