How to Recycle Broken China into Mosaic Pots

Written by natasha lawrence
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Create a pretty and useful mosaic style clay pot with broken pieces of China. Recycle broken cups, plates or tea pots. Attach them in random fashion. You want to contrast designs, varying textures and colours. Even handles, lids and spouts can add interest to your creation. It's an excellent way to reuse treasured China pieces that you don't want to throw away. Make the pot for yourself to enjoy or give it as a gift.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Broken pieces of China
  • Grout
  • Plastic knife
  • Rubber gloves
  • Metal file
  • Clay pot
  • Clear sealant
  • Black permanent marker

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Sort through broken China pieces. Break large pieces into smaller section. Place these larger pieces in a paper bag and break with a hammer. Wear protective eye goggles when doing this. Also use parts of tea pot spouts, handles and lids for added interest. Dull very sharp edges with a small metal file.

    How to Recycle Broken China into Mosaic Pots
  2. 2

    Using a plastic knife, apply the grout. Work small areas on the clay pot before moving to another section. The grout dries fairly quickly. Push a China piece into the grout to secure it. Apply the next piece close to the one before. Continue adding to the pot until all areas are covered from top to bottom.

  3. 3

    Let the pot dry completely.

  4. 4

    When the pot is dry and easy to handle, turn it over. Use a black permanent marker to write on the bottom. Write where the China pieces came from, the date it was created and who made it.

  5. 5

    Use a clear sealant to secure the pieces to the pot and fill in tiny spaces. This will give it a nice, shiny finish.

Tips and warnings

  • If some of the grout gets on your China pieces while you're working, wipe it off with a wet paper towel.
  • Use care when working with broken China pieces. One can easily become scraped or harmed when dealing with sharp edges.

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