How to Remove White Film From the Tongue

Written by darla ferrara
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The presence of a white coating on the tongue has a variety of causes. Dead cells may collect when the tongue is not brushed on a regular basis. This leads to a foul taste in the mouth and frequent unpleasant breath. White tongue is also associated with a condition called oral thrush. Oral thrush presents when a fungus, known as Candida, begins to grow in the mouth. Dealing with everyday white tongue build-up is a straightforward process that may only require some changes in oral hygiene. Take action to remove the white coating on your tongue and sour breath with it.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Soft toothbrush
  • Toothpaste
  • Tongue scraper
  • Water

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Instructions

    Toothbrush

  1. 1

    Apply a small amount of toothpaste to a soft toothbrush.

  2. 2

    Brush the tongue using slow movements. Don't apply too much pressure.

  3. 3

    Make several sweeps with the brush, moving from front to back. This will remove dead skin cells. Go as far back as you are able without gagging.

  4. 4

    Rinse your mouth with warm water after you have finished brushing.

    Tongue Scraper

  1. 1

    Stick out your tongue.

  2. 2

    Take one end of the scraper in each hand and reach the arch of the tool to the back of your tongue.

  3. 3

    Scrape forward over your tongue several times, rinsing the scraper after each pass to remove residue from the tool.

  4. 4

    Rinse your mouth out with warm water after you have completed scraping.

Tips and warnings

  • Increase your daily water intake to help loosen debris on your tongue.
  • A rinse of warm salt water once a day may help remove the white coating on your tongue and keep it away. Be careful when using this method. Spit the salt water out, do not swallow it.
  • Chronic or persistent white film on the tongue may be indication of illness. If this is a reoccurring problem not improved by good oral hygiene, see a doctor or dentist. You may have an infection that requires medication.

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