DISCOVER
×

How to Donate Television to Charity

Updated February 21, 2017

If you've recently spoiled yourself with a new television set or received one as gift, you may be looking to clear space in your home by donating your television to charity. There are several national charities that would most likely be glad to accept your television set, though also keep in mind local organisations that might need one or be able to put it to good use. Before you donate, always test your television set to make sure it's in perfect working order.

Using your computer, visit the Salvation Army website at www.salvationarmyusa.org. There you'll find the nearest location of a Salvation Army thrift store nearest you. You can either bring your television in to the shop in person, where you'll receive a receipt. Or you can call the shop nearest you to arrange a pickup of your television set. The truck driver will give you a receipt at that time.

Contact state schools, libraries, homeless and women's shelters, and elderly homes. These are all places that would most likely welcome a working television set to use for educational or entertainment purposes. Not all of these places will be able to give you a receipt, but they will be grateful.

Visit the Goodwill website at www.goodwill.org. There are donation centres all over the United States, and using the website, you can easily find the centre nearest you. You should call ahead of time to make sure that your television set is in line with their criteria for donating electronic equipment. You will receive a receipt upon dropping off the item.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

Lane Cummings is originally from New York City. She attended the High School of Performing Arts in dance before receiving her Bachelor of Arts in literature and her Master of Arts in Russian literature at the University of Chicago. She has lived in St. Petersburg, Russia, where she lectured and studied Russian. She began writing professionally in 2004 for the "St. Petersburg Times."