How to kneel down after bilateral knee replacement

Written by lori lapierre
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Email

Most of us take kneeling for granted. But for anyone who has had one knee---or both knees---replaced for various health reasons, the act of kneeling can be painful, frightening or completely impossible. However, most doctors do not prohibit it, and there may be times when a patient feels it is necessary, especially if he or she lives alone. Before attempting to kneel, you will need to think through the process to ensure success, and avoid injury to the new knees.

Skill level:

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • Cushion, pillow or towel to kneel on
  • Furniture or walker to provide support when pulling up

Show MoreHide


  1. 1

    Wait until at least two months after surgery before attempting to kneel, as recommended by orthopaedic surgeons.

  2. 2

    Provide support for the kneeling process. Do not kneel down before first making sure there is something nearby to support your weight as you lower and lift yourself back into a standing position, especially if you live alone. Have a walker, chair or table nearby that can provide support for your weight when you pull yourself back up.

  3. 3

    Protect the knees with something soft. Kneeling is already uncomfortable, and placing the replaced knee on a hard surface, such as an uncovered floor, can be more difficult. Use a cushion, pillow or towel to give the knees a soft support during the kneeling process.

  4. 4

    Kneel slowly, especially the first few times you attempt this after recovery. Grip the support you have already chosen, and manoeuvre your body down slowly, using one knee first, and then the other. If there is excessive pain, stop immediately and pull yourself upright. This exercise may take several attempts before it can be done without pain; in fact, some orthopaedic surgeons believe it will get easier the more you do it.

  5. 5

    Pull yourself up slowly, as well, to make sure you do not strain the ligaments holding the new knee in place.

Tips and warnings

  • Check with your doctor before attempting to kneel, as some surgeons do not recommend kneeling if it can be avoided.

Don't Miss

  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.